The Case Against Marriage, Book by Glenn Campbell
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The Case Against Marriage by Glenn Campbell - cover
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On the fence about marriage?   Read this NOW!!!

“The most insightful book on relationships I have ever read.” Oscar Wendel
“Brilliant and eye-opening... a life-changing and illuminating experience for me.”KarBytes
“READ THIS BOOK. If you want to make an intelligent decision and look at a variety of perspectives, this book is gold.”Lettie
“This is a must read for you if you're contemplating marriage... If you truly love someone, getting married is probably the worst relationship decision you can make.” Hilary Ferreira
Read all the reviews on Amazon
“Five bucks could save five years or more of your life!” Gecko

        The Case Against Marriage, a new book by Glenn Campbell        

Available Now on Catalog Entry with free sample chapters (released April 2013)
Only $4.99 for Kindle Edition
NOTE: You don't need a Kindle Reader to read a Kindle book.
(Use the free Kindle app on any computer or device.)
Available Now in Paperback Via Amazon ($13 in USA)
Available Now in Turkish! Turkish paperback translation available on Amazon
or directly from the publisher (see below for history)
Also see Glenn's other book:Kilroy Café: Philosophy for the Modern Age

On this page: description · chapters · samples · audio · turkish · author · resources · celebrity quotes        Facebook  event timeline        YouTube  intro · a fallacy

Book Description





Not just a critique of marriage but one of the best books EVER on romantic relationships and how they really work. What do people want from love? How do they think marriage will help them, and what does it really give them?

Marriage is all about love, right? Actually, it’s more about money. Behind the romantic language, marriage is primarily a financial agreement merging the assets and liabilities of two individuals into a single corporate entity. After your wedding, the money you earn and debts you incur are no longer legally yours; they belong to the marital “community”—a common pot that both of you contribute to and draw from. It’s a lot like Communism: an idealistic sharing of resources and risks supposedly for the common good.

What could go wrong with this plan? Pretty much the same things that brought down political Communism in the late 20th Century: It slows growth, suppresses initiative, dilutes responsibility and mires decisions in bureaucracy. Healthy relationships need clear boundaries, and marriage erases too many of them at once.

Marriage was designed for medieval times. Back then, life was hard and short; most marriages were arranged, and a woman was essentially the property of her husband. Marriage was a sort of licensing system for sex and childbirth. Once the relationship was officially approved and the religious ceremony concluded, the couple's overriding goal was to produce as many children as possible, knowing that many would die.

Times have changed. Birth control, longer lifespans, sexual freedom and women’s rights have rewritten the rules of matrimony. Under the laws of most Western countries, marriage is no longer a sex license or child-rearing contract, only a contract to merge financial resources. “It’s only money,” couples may say, but Glenn Campbell argues that love and money are separate issues that should be kept that way.

In modern Western society, unmarried people can legally have sex, live together, raise children, buy property together and do nearly everything else associated with a committed relationship, so why do they need to marry at all? What are you really getting when you walk down the aisle? Is marriage merely a public announcement to make your relationship “official,” or does it fundamentally change the relationship?

With simple, powerful and accessible arguments, The Case Against Marriage explains why, if you truly love someone, marriage may not be the wisest way to show it.


Chapters

Preface — Introduction — What is Marriage? — Pair Bonding [Read the first 4 chapters for free on Amazon] — Sex and Intimacy — Loneliness and Engulfment — Love is not Charity — The Dilemma of Beauty — The Problems of Communism — The Dark Star Duet — A Bureaucracy of Two — Commercial Delusions — Wedding Pornography — Charles' and Diana's Wedding Disaster — Commitment and Negotiation — Love and Enabling — Love Can't Change Personality — The Power of Money — The Credit Card of Life — Children — Advisors and Sycophants — The Evolution of Needs — The Seduction of Novelty — The Investment Effect — Back to the Sixties — When Love Ends but the Marriage Doesn't — Trapped in their Own Musuem — Problems of Living — Lifelong Learning — Personal Development — Social PressurePersonal EconomiesThe Meaning of Life — Death Benefits — Ban Gay Marriage! (Heterosexual Marriage, too!) — Addendum: The Istanbul Interview — Addendum: 100 Tweets on Marriage — Acknowledgements

Free Samples

Read about Glenn's Family Court project that inspired this book in a 2005 article in the Las Vegas Sun

The Turkish Edition

The Turkish language translation of this book was published before the original English edition. A paperback was released in Istanbul in Dec. 2012 and is now available in paperback from Amazon. Here is the publisher's catalog entry (in Turkish) and a crude English translation via Google. The author visited Istanbul before and after publication. Here are his photo albums from Istanbul. More book info: Back cover text.

Why Turkish? (The author does not speak Turkish himself.) Glenn Campbell wrote most of the book in 2007 but got frustrated with marketing it. Instead he put it on his website and forgot about it. The Turkish publisher found it there in 2012 and decided it was appropriate for the Turkish market. Having an actual published book got the author motivated to revisit the project in English. In early 2013, he re-edited the manuscript for a revised English edition.

Note: The Turkish translation is based on an earlier version of the manuscript. The English version is more up-to-date and includes a few new chapters.

“Glenn Campbell is one of my heroes. With the Groom Lake Desert Rat he dragged UFO craziness and the world's most popular top secret air force base into pop consciousness. Now, he does for marriage what he did with Area 51 - i.e., blow that shit outta the water...” —Scott Christian Carr (author of "Champion Mountain")

About Glenn Campbell

Glenn Campbell in Istanbul, June 2013 Glenn Campbell has worn many hats over the years, including programmer, photographer, philosopher, perpetual traveler and agnostic UFO researcher. In the 1990s, he was an often-televised expert on Area 51, the secret military base in the Nevada desert. (Profiled in The New York Times.) If you have heard the name "Area 51", it is due in part to his early efforts to publicize the base when it was unknown to the mainstream media. In the early 2000s, Glenn shifted his attention to Family Court in Las Vegas, where he become the self-appointed "Family Court Guy," studying divorce, delinquency and child welfare cases as an outside observer. (Profiled in the Las Vegas Sun and interviewed on public radio.) Sitting in on hundreds of court cases and writing about them later, Glenn began to refine the philosophical ideas expressed in his books. You can't really know love, he says, until you understand how and why it falls apart.

Glenn has a massive oeuvre of work available online, including hundreds of essays and videos and thousands of photos from around the world. He tweets as @BadDalaiLama and posts new travel photos almost every day to his public Facebook page. Here are some starting links to his work relating to marriage:


Anti-Marriage Resources

Here are some links to marriage skepticism from others. It is remarkable how few resources we have found, especially since most of the human population is touched by the institution. If you know a link that should be added here,
contact the author.

Celebrity Quotes On Marriage

    “Marriage is a fine institution, but I'm not ready for an institution.” —Mae West

    “Marriage is the miracle that transforms a kiss from a pleasure into a duty” —Helen Rowland

    “Marriage is like a cage; one sees the birds outside desperate to get in, and those inside equally desperate to get out.” —Michel de Montaigne

    “Marriage is a ghastly public confession of a strictly private intention.” —Nick Faldo

    “Government has NO business in Marriage. None. No special tax breaks for anyone. Get married in church, by a mechanic, doesn't matter to me.” —Glenn Beck

    “Marriage is the only adventure open to the cowardly” —Voltaire

    “Marriage is like putting your hand into a bag of snakes in the hope of pulling out an eel.” —Leonardo da Vinci

    “Marriage is neither heaven nor hell, it is simply purgatory.” —Abraham Lincoln

    “Marriage is an adventure, like going to war.” —G.K. Chesterton

    “Marriage changes passion ... suddenly you're in bed with a relative.” —Unknown

    “After marriage, husband and wife become two sides of a coin; they just can't face each other, but still they stay together.” —Hermant Joshi

    “Marriage is not a word; it is a sentence” —Oscar Wilde

    “Any intelligent woman who reads the marriage contract, and then goes into it, deserves all the consequences.” —Isadora Duncan

    “Almost no one is foolish enough to imagine that he automatically deserves great success in any field of activity; yet almost everyone believes that he automatically deserves success in marriage.” —Sydney Harris

    “On rare occasions one does hear of a miraculous case of a married couple falling in love after marriage, but on close examination it will be found that it is a mere adjustment to the inevitable.” —Emma Goldman

    “The only cure for love is marriage” —Anonymous

    “Marriage resembles a pair of shears, so joined that they cannot be separated, often moving in opposite directions, yet always punishing anyone who comes in between them,” —Sydney Smith

    “Marriage is a good deal like a circus: there is not as much in it as is represented in the advertising.” —Edgar Watson Howe

    “The value of marriage is not that adults produce children but that children produce adults.” —Peter de Vries

    “Marriage is like life: it is a field of battle, not a bed of roses.” —Robert Louis Stevenson

    “Marriage is the tomb of love.” —Casanova

    “There would be more good marriages if the marriage partners didn't live together.” —Friedrich Nietzsche

    “Marriage is an attempt to solve problems together which you didnt even have when you were on your own.” —Eddie Cantor

    “In marriage, a man becomes slack and selfish, and undergoes a fatty degeneration of his moral being.” —Robert Louis Stevenson

    “Marriage must incessantly contend with a monster that devours everything: familiarity.” —Honore De Balzac

    “Marriage functions best when both partners remain somewhat unmarried.” —Claudia Cardinale

    “There's a way of transferring funds that is even faster than electronic banking. It's called marriage.” —Unknown

  • Also see Glenn Campbell's 100 Tweets on Marriage (His original quotes as good as the ones above!)






The Case Against Marriage, Book by Glenn Campbell  Marriage Ball and Chain  Books by Glenn Campbell
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